File:Localización de Galicia.svg
File:Localización de Galicia.svg


The most isolated region in Spain that resides directly over Portugal, the autonomous region of Galicia has maintained its own culture and language over time. Starting in the 8th century, Galicia used their own language as the only official standing in the nation, whether they were considered independent or part of Spain. Although it never gained national acceptance, Galicia has survived in its use of poetry and literature. Despite being a native Galician, in his dictatorship General Francisco Franco prohibited the use of the Galician language. Galician residents were barred from using the language in a court of law or in any public venue. Spoken by three to four million residents, mainly in Galicia, it shares more characteristics with Portuguese than Castellano. Currently their is a movement in Galicia and Portugal to turn Portuguese and Galician into single language. The movement is known as Reintegrationism. The features of Galician today are much closer to Portuguese than the original Galician, which has the distinction as an official language in Spain. The difference between Spanish, Galician and Portuguese can be seen in the charts below.

English
Galician (Official)
Galician (Reintegrationist)
Portuguese
Spanish
Good morning
Bo día / Bos días
Bom Dia
Bom Dia / Bons dias
Buenos días
What is your name?
Como te chamas?
¿Cómo te llamas?
I love you
Quérote / Ámote
Amo-te
Te quiero / Te amo
Excuse me
Desculpe
Perdón / Disculpe
Thanks / Thank you
Grazas / Graciñas
Obrigado
Gracias
Welcome
Benvido
Bem-vido
Bem-vindo
Bienvenido
Goodbye
Adeus*
Adiós
Yes
Si
Sim

No
Non
Nom
Não
No
Dog
Can
Cam
Cão
Perro (Rarely Can)
Grandfather
Avó /aˈbo/
Avô** /ɐˈvo/
Abuelo
Newspaper
Periódico / Xornal
Jornal
Periódico
Mirror
Espello
Espelho
Espejo


Bibliography
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galician_language
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Francoist_Spain